Russia-Ukraine Roundtable features discussions on global issues

The discussion, part of the University's International Education Week activities, featured faculty members from the College of Arts and Sciences.

The discussion, part of the University's International Education Week activities, featured faculty members from the College of Arts and Sciences.

As part of International Education Week, a panel of professors and experts hosted a roundtable discussing the conflict between Russia and Ukraine.

During the discussion, multiple viewpoints and sides of the conflict were explored. The conflict is a multi-faceted one, with a bloody history, fierce politics and complex military strategies coming into play.

Professors speaking at the event included: Dr. Michael Slobodchikoff, a professor in political science, and Dr. Margaret Gnoinska and Dr. Robert Kane, professors in history. The professors presented different perspectives of the war, from the underlying historical and political disputes to the military technology in use.

The roundtable was beneficial to attendees, who may have heard a distinct viewpoint that they hadn’t thought about.

“Having a discussion [about the conflict] helps with knowledge,” said Xander Pless, a history major who attended the event. “There are a lot of ignorant people out there, and having an event like this helps give people a better understanding of what’s going on.”

With Tuesday’s breaking news of the war spilling over into Poland with a missile striking a village, the experts speculated on what Poland and NATO’s reactions to the tragedy might be.

“Technically, the attack against a NATO member could invoke the NATO article five, which is an attack on one is an attack on all,” said Kane, an Air Force Veteran. “I don’t think that’s going to happen.”

Global issues are especially impactful on a place such as a college campus, where students come from all around the globe. Although there might be disagreements on worldviews, events such as this one help develop and shape the perspectives of one another, says Pless.

“I’ve been following the conflict since the beginning,” said Pless. “I appreciated their viewpoints, and it helped enhance what I already knew.”

International Education Week events continue through Thursday on the Troy Campus.

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