TROY Theatre and Dance to present “Into the Woods” April 18-28

“Into the Woods” is a fairytale that follows a variety of Brothers Grimm characters as they pursue their wishes.

“Into the Woods” is a fairytale that follows a variety of Brothers Grimm characters as they pursue their wishes.

From April 18 through the 28, the Troy University Department of Theatre and Dance is presenting a rendition of “Into the Woods” at the Trojan Center Theater.

Originally created by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine, “Into the Woods” is a fairytale that follows a variety of Brothers Grimm characters as they pursue their wishes. The story centers around a baker and his wife, who desperately want to have a child but can’t because of a witch’s curse.

“The show is all about wishes, generational curses and what we do to get our wishes,” said Lily Kate Gwin, a senior theater major from Fairhope, Ala. who plays the witch. “It’s hard to explain the plot without giving any spoilers, but all the characters come together in a really interesting cluster of grief, love and hopefulness.”

“Into the Woods” has a variety of characters and storylines, which fits the diverse range of students in the Theater and Dance department, said Ellen Foxx.

“Our director told us that like [Into the Woods] has a lot of stories intertwining, she wanted that to be reflected in how we perform and the cast,” said Foxx, a senior theater major from Montgomery, Ala. who plays the baker’s wife. “There’s a lot of diversity and people who come from different backgrounds and beliefs.”

Patchwork is an idea that is enmeshed in the story in many ways, including costume design. Gwin said that it represents the humanity of the story.

“We consider this a patchwork musical in that it’s a patchwork of different stories and people,” she said. “Every one of our characters has a bit of patchwork on them, and it all comes together like a big quilt. That patchwork is where we find the center of who we are as a person.”

Because of the layers in the musical, there’s something new each time viewers see it.

“There are so many different takeaways and pieces of advice in the show,” Gwin said. “Even diehard fans of this show, like myself, learn something else every time they come back to it.”

Tickets are $10, or $5 with a TROY student ID. They can be bought here or at the Trojan Center box office near Barnes and Noble.

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