Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum to host 9th annual Juneteenth celebration on June 15

This year's Juneteenth celebration, featuring children's activities, vendors, musical entertainment and free museum admission, is set for June 15.

This year's Juneteenth celebration, featuring children's activities, vendors, musical entertainment and free museum admission, is set for June 15.

Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum will host its 9th annual Juneteenth celebration on Saturday, June 15, featuring live performances throughout the day, local vendors, children’s activities and free admission to the museum.

The free event will take place in the 200 block of Montgomery Street, which runs in front of the museum, and will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Observed annually on June 19, Juneteenth is the oldest known commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States, commemorating the date in 1865 when Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger and his troops landed at Galveston Texas with the news that the Civil War had ended and the enslaved were free. In 2021, President Joe Biden signed legislation declaring Juneteenth as a federal holiday.

“The Rosa Parks Museum is excited for our ninth annual Juneteenth celebration,” said Donna Beisel, the museum’s director of operations. “We welcome all to come out and enjoy this time of celebration and commemoration.”

The event will feature emcee Kory Ward and DJ at Large.  Headlining the day’s musical entertainment will be Nameless performing around 3:30 p.m. In addition to local food, merchandise, and informational vendors, the event will include arts & crafts; a kids’ area; and an authentic 1950s Montgomery city bus and 1960s Greyhound bus that visitors can visit.

A book-signing with author Willie Freeman will take place the museum’s auditorium at 11:30 a.m.

At 2 p.m. in the auditorium, the OnPoint Network TV will present “Cultural Shift: Redefining Mental Health in Black Lives.” Writer and producer Amanda Barnes Granger explores the intricacies of mental health as several families share their deeply personal experiences. Their stories, marked by loss, resilience, and eventual recovery, shed light on the often-unspoken struggles that many face in the African American community. The purpose of this documentary is to encourage those in need to seek help, while removing the stigma attached to receiving mental health services.

For additional information, contact the museum at 334-241-8615 or visit the museum’s Facebook page.

FacebookTwitterPinterestLinkedIn